Taiwan’s Offshore Wind Booming

Country Overview

The Republic of China (Taiwan) is an island nation located in the South China Sea. The population of Taiwan is approximately 23.94 million people.

In 2022, Taiwan’s economy was ranked 21st in the world in gross domestic product (GDP). The country’s economy is dependent on the export of integrated circuits, office machine parts, computers, blank audio media, LCDs, copper foil, and tapioca.

Environmental Policies

In 2009, Taiwan’s government enacted the Renewable Energy Development Act, which was designed to increase the renewable energy power plants in the country.

In 2011, the nuclear disaster in Fukushima, Japan created strong opposition to nuclear power in Taiwan. Taiwan’s government has announced it will not build any new nuclear power plants, nor extend the 40-year operating license for the country’s five nuclear power plants.

In 2016, Taiwan signed the Paris Climate Agreement, committing to reduce 2005 greenhouse gas emission levels by 20% by 2030 and 50% by 2050.

Power Generation Capabilities

In 2021, 100 % of the people in Taiwan had access to electricity. In 2022, state-owned utility, Taiwan Power Company used coal (42.8%),  liquified natural gas (39.6%), nuclear energy (8.3%), renewable energy (7.7%), and refined petroleum (1.6%) to generate the nation’s electricity. Solar, hydropower, and wind are the dominant types of renewable energy used to generate electricity in Taiwan.

Recent renewable energy projects in Taiwan include:

  • 900 MW Offshore Wind Project – In May 2022, Danish power company, Ørsted commissioned the Greater Changhua 1 and 2a offshore wind project at a site approximately 25 miles off the west coast of Taiwan.
  • 920 MW Offshore Wind Project – Ørsted is continuing work on the Changhua 2b and 4 wind project at a site approximately 30 miles off the west coast of Taiwan. The project is scheduled to be commissioned in 2026.
  • 640 MW Offshore Wind Project – In December 2021, German renewable energy company, WPD AG commissioned the Yunlin offshore wind project at a site approximately 5 miles off the west coast of Taiwan.
  • 602 MW Offshore Wind Project – Canadian renewable energy company, Northland Power Company is continuing work on the Bei Neng offshore wind project, which are located off the coast of Chunghwa county. The project is forecast to be commissioned by year-end 2027.
  • 500 MW Offshore Wind Project – Northland Power Company is continuing work on the Cangeng offshore wind project, which are located off the coast of Taichung county. The project is forecast to be commissioned by year-end 2027.
  • 272 MW Solar Project – In April 2023, Singaporean renewables developer Vena Energy commissioned the E2 Solar project in the southern region of the country.
  • 150 MW Solar + 15 MW Energy Storage Project – In September 2022, Taiwanese solar company, URE Corp commissioned a solar plus energy storage project at a site approximately 170 miles south-southwest of the nation’s capital, Taipei.
  • 7 MW Floating Solar Project – In September 2021, state-owned utility Taiwan Power Corp commissioned a floating solar project at the Wushantou hydroelectric power dam in the southwest region of the island.

Conclusions

Taiwan imports virtually all its fossil fuels (coal, oil, and natural gas) for power generation, heating, and transportation. In 2021, the country imported U.S. $24.6 Billion of crude oil and U.S. $10.9 Billion of liquified natural gas.

On 24 February 2022, Russia invaded Ukraine, prompting the European Union, United Kingdom, United States, Canada, Japan, South Korea, Australia, and New Zealand to place economic sanctions on Russian imports and exports. As a result, the crude oil and natural gas prices increased by over 50% from May 2021 to May 2022.

Expensive fossil fuel imports have prompted an offshore wind project boom in Taiwan.

Jack Kerfoot

Website – “Our Energy Conundrum”

www.jackkerfoot.com

 

Jack Kerfoot is a scientist, energy expert, and author of the book FUELING AMERICA, An Insider’s Journey and articles for The Hill, one of the largest independent political news sites in the United States. He has been interviewed on over 100 radio, podcast, and television stations from New York City to Los Angeles on a diverse range of energy issues.

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