New York State’s Future Is “Blowin’ In The Wind”

The population of the state of New York is approximately 19.44 million people[1]. In April 2020, state utilities used nuclear energy (34.9%), renewable energy (35.9%) and natural gas (29.2%) to generate electricity. Hydropower, wind, biomass, and solar are the primary sources of renewable energy in the state[2].

New York’s reliance on nuclear energy contributes to state’s high electricity prices. In April 2020, the average price for electricity in New York was U.S. 17.33 ¢ per kWh, which is the 9th most expensive state in the nation. The average price for electricity in the United States in April 2020 was 13.28 ¢ per kWh.

On July 18, 2019, New York Governor, Andrew Cuomo signed into law, the Climate & Communities Protection Act. The legislation mandates that the state will achieve zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. The law is designed to eliminate 85% of the state’s greenhouse gas emissions, while creating carbon-capture or sequestration systems for the remaining 15%.

Offshore wind is a critical element for New York to achieve zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. The state has a 9,000 MW offshore wind target goal by 2035 with the majority of the power going to the New York city area.

State energy regulator, New York Energy Research and Development Authority (NYERD) have launched tenders for 2,500 MW of offshore wind projects and 1,500 MW of onshore renewable energy projects. To date, NYERD has formerly awarded offshore wind projects with a total capacity of 1,700 MW.

Europe has been producing electricity from offshore wind farms for over twenty years. The offshore wind power potential in America is far greater than Europe. The answer to New York’s energy future Is Blowin’ In The Wind[3].

 

Jack Kerfoot

Website – “Our Energy Conundrum”

www.jackkerfoot.com

 

 

 

 

 

[1] Worldpopulationreview.com

[2] U.S, Energy Information Agency, www.eia.gov

[3] “Blowin’ In The Wind,” song written by Bob Dylan in 1962.

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